Lg1

Your next smartphone may very well be able to bend in half — if LG’s technology ever comes to market, that is. Following news that both Samsung and LG are preparing smartphones with curved displays, LG has announced that it is developing flexible batteries that could make their devices virtually bendable.

LG has recently started production of what it calls “cable batteries,” which are flexible, wearable batteries that utilize low electricity and are waterproof, according to an LG news release issued through the Korean Newswire. Their durability, energy efficiency and flexible form factor make them an attractive option for upcoming wearable devices, and LG claims that they can even be tied into a knot.

This isn’t likely to be the battery that ends up in LG’s alleged G Flex curved display phone, however. The Korea-based company has another component called the curved battery that is optimized for devices with curved displays, and LG says that will power its next generation of mobile devices.

LG has already been implementing non-traditional battery design into its current products, such as the “stepped battery” form factor that is present in devices such as the G2. This type of battery refers to a design that stacks two batteries on top of one another, creating what looks like a step. This method is said to take full advantage of a mobile device’s internal space, allowing for more battery without compromising its design.

That could explain why the G2 lasted longer than most phones during the LAPTOP Battery Test, which consists of continuously surfing the Web over LTE with the display brightness set to 40%. The T-Mobile G2 lasted for an astounding 13 hours during that test, which is longer than any phone we’ve ever tested.

The introduction of flexible batteries marks a rather significant breakthrough in the future of both smartphones and wearable devices. Although companies such as Samsung have been flaunting bendable displays since CES 2102, the prospect of flexible gadgets had seemed far-fetched because of necessary internals, such as batteries, that couldn’t be bent until now.

Both Samsung and LG are rumored to unveil the world’s first commercially available smartphones with curved displays sometime this month, which would mean that these gadgets would have virtually unbreakable displays. The touch screens on these devices would be made of plastic and would use flexible properties to keep them from breaking, but the displays themselves won’t be bendable.

It’s clear that LG built its latest flagship phone to last. If its blazing fast Snapdragon 800 processor wasn’t enough, the G2’s 3,000 mAh battery lasted a record-setting 13 hours and 44 minutes on the LAPTOP Battery Test. The AT&T version lasted 10 hours and 42 minutes, while the Verizon model lasted 9 hours and 14 minutes. All of these runtimes are great. While the back-mounted power and volume keys aren’t for everyone, overall the G2 is a formidable Android phone that’s built to go the distance.

Image: LG PR

This article originally published at LAPTOP Magazine
here

Read more: http://mashable.com/2013/10/08/lg-bendable-batteries/

I love acronyms and here are a few for today!

Positive Energy – Fuels The Spirit – Enhances Business
Unconditional Love – Lead with firm compassion and understanding
Skill – Always grow to be the Best Of The Greatest
Help – If you help enough others get what they want you will get what you want – Zig Ziglar

Mechanic – Get the best, Tools, People, Assets
Operations – Good Systems and Procedures Make for Good business
Research – Know your product and Market – Who What When Where Why and How
Expansion – Growth = Success = Profit

Faithful                                                     Get
Reliable                                                     Our
Independent                                             Actions
Enterprising                                              Linked to
Noble                                                         Success
Dependable
Supportive

Yes                          No is—–              Not
Expansion                                            Optional!
Succeeds

This was the only reason to go to McDonald’s.

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25. Tinosaurs (1986)

Tinosaurs (1986)

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Via ebay.com

Cute and colorful, these PVC dinosaurs (and cave people?) were a little different than your average Happy Meal toy as they were not a tie-in product for a TV show or movie.

24. Popoids (1984)

Popoids (1984)

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Via ebay.com

These toys were just a series of stretchy and bendy tubes that basically allowed you to create a either a spider or an octopus. Although since the tubes had the consistency of a Squeezit bottle, you had to be careful not to stretch them too far for fear of ripping.

23. Ronald McDonald Cloth Doll (1984)

Ronald McDonald Cloth Doll (1984)

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Via etsy.com

A favorite since the 1970s, this toy was reintroduced in the 1980s to terrify a new generation of kids.

22. Halloween Pails (1985)

Halloween Pails (1985)

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Via sydlexia.com

Sure, these were the suckiest things you could use to carry on candy on Halloween night; the handle would usually painfully lodge itself deep into your hand under the weight of the candy — that is if it didn’t pop off. But since the pails had cool designs and were from McDonald’s, they were an ’80s kids essential.

21. Mickey’s Birthdayland Race Cars (1989)

Mickey's Birthdayland Race Cars (1989)

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Via ebay.com

In honor of Mickey’s 60th birthday, Disney and McDonald’s partnered up to release these awesome little pullback racers, which, bonus, also came with a box you could turn into a tunnel.

20. Stompers 4×4 (1986)

Stompers 4x4 (1986)

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Via route21.com

What made these so special you ask? Well, unlike regular cars or pull racers, these bad boys ran on their own power, or an AA battery to be exact. So all you had to do was sit back and watch it drive in a straight-ish line before crashing into a wall.

19. Cinderella’s Jaq and Gus Plush Christmas Ornaments (1987)

freddiescollectibles.com

freddiescollectibles.com

 

OK, so technically not a toy, but these mice were too cool to just hang on the Christmas tree. Also, I’m sure pretty sure they never really released Jaq, ‘cause I was stuck with, like, six Gus ornaments.

18. Astrosniks (1984)

Astrosniks (1984)

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Via ebay.com

These toys made the perfect villains for your Smurf figures.

17. Hot Wheels (1983)

Hot Wheels (1983)

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Via s40.photobucket.com

What’s better than a Hot Wheels car? A free one with your meal! You could NEVER have enough Hot Wheels.

16. Playmobil Figures (1982)

Playmobil Figures (1982)

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Via ebay.co.uk

Playmobil figures were usually the toys that rich kids played with, so getting one from McDonalds was like winning the lotto.

15. Fry Kids (1989)

Fry Kids (1989)

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Via ebay.com

These were exceptionally detailed for fast-food toys. They also didn’t look as much like fries as they did colorful mops.

14. Kissyfur (1987)

Kissyfur (1987)

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Via ebay.com

Mickey D’s was the only place you could get toys from this seriously underrated cartoon.

13. Bambi Figurines (1988)

Bambi Figurines (1988)

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Via pinterest.com

These toys were not only well made, but they also had various moving parts that made them infinitely posable. They also happened to have that distinct plastic smell that would never go away.

12. Berenstain Bears (1986)

Berenstain Bears (1986)

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Via etsy.com

Sure they got super dirty after the first time you played with them — thanks to their felt head and hands — but they were awesome and came with their own cool accessory. Also these things should’ve come with a warning that they were not meant for bath time.

11. McDonald’s Pullback Race Cars (1985)

McDonald's Pullback Race Cars (1985)

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Via etsy.com

What made these so special? First, they were perfectly sized and could easily fit into a child’s pocket. Second, their McDonald’s theme told all the other kids on the playground, “Yeah, my parents love and indulge me enough that they got me a Happy Meal.”

10. DuckTales Figures (1988)

DuckTales Figures (1988)

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Via ohnotheydidnt.livejournal.com

DuckTales was the must-see late ’80s cartoon and these Happy Meal toys were an essential. Just looking at them makes me want to break out into the theme song (woo-oo!).

9. Garfield Vehicles (1989)

Garfield Vehicles (1989)

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Via pinterest.com

In the ’80s Garfield — thanks in large part to his Saturday morning cartoon Garfield and Friends — was actually really cool and kids wanted to play with his toys. Although he is bit more active in these figures than he was on the show (or the comic).

8. Mac Tonight “Moon Man” Figures (1988)

Mac Tonight "Moon Man" Figures (1988)

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Via forum.earwolf.com

Let’s be honest, Mac Tonight was creepy as fuck! But these toys helped make him a little more bearable.

7. Oliver & Company (1988)

Oliver & Company (1988)

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Via etsy.com

Was there anything greater than a Happy Meal Disney film tie-in? NOPE. These were made even more special because they weren’t just ordinary Happy Meal figures, oh no, these were finger puppets.

6. Chip ‘n Dale Rescue Rangers Cars (1989)

Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers Cars (1989)

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Via etsy.com

Seriously, these things were great, not only were they cars, BUT you could interchange the parts (giving you hours of endless entertainment). The only thing that would have made them perfect was if you could actually pull the figures out.

5. McNugget Buddies (1988)

McNugget Buddies (1988)

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Via ebay.com

Where do I even begin? These things were awesome for various reasons. First, they were super unique. Second, they came with interchangeable accessories. Third, and most importantly, they were CHICKEN MCNUGGETS and every kid loved McNuggets.

4. The Little Mermaid (1989)

The Little Mermaid (1989)

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Via etsy.com

These were the most EPIC bath time toys you could ever have. I mean, where else could you truly recreate Ariel’s adventures?

3. Fraggle Rock (1988)

Fraggle Rock (1988)

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Via etsy.com

Every ’80s kid owned at least one of these. While Gobo might have been the most prized toy, it certainly wasn’t the best. That honor went to Wimbly, who also came with a Boober figure attached.

2. Muppet Babies (1987)

Muppet Babies (1987)

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Via ebay.com

These were amazing. First and foremost, they were toys associated with the greatest cartoon of all time. Secondly, they not only came with their own cars, but you could actually pull the figures out and switch them around.

1. Changeables (1987)

Changeables (1987)

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Via ebay.com

Seriously, what kid didn’t want to play with food that turned into a robot? Yes, they were essentially Transformer knockoffs, but they’re still the coolest and most epic toy line McDonald’s has ever released.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/briangalindo/the-25-greatest-happy-meal-toys-of-the-80s

Absentmindedly (sorry, obsessively) checking my Klout score this morning, I stumbled upon a perk — a shiny ad for some kind of new Starbucks drink offered to the uber-influencers of the influence-counting service. A perk! I love perks.

Klout perks have been around for a couple years, and they’re no joke, even if you think the service is: upgrades to a first class lounge at SFO, VIP access at a Hollywood nightclub, deeper discounts on Gilt and more. One guy, as of May, had collected 63 perks, including a phone and an invitation to a VH1 awards show. In June, Klout bragged it has delivered 700,000 perks across 350 campaigns.

Unfortunately, as soon as I clicked on the Starbucks perk for my free drink, my heart sank.

It seems that my Klout score of 59 was just not high enough to meet their bar of influence, a Klout score of 60. I am not influential enough to be worthy of a Starbucks Refresher. Surely, there were things I could qualify for, though? I mean, I’m not INVISIBLE. I have INFLUENCE. I’m not the most powerful person in the Kloutworld (scores go up to 100) but I’m certainly average or better. Can’t I at least pick up a pass to a Bud Lime party?

NOPE. To be fair, it seems that the party already happened, and it happened in Chicago and Washington, DC. I am in San Francisco.

Increasingly desperate to prove my Klout self-worth and validate my Kloutsistence with perks, though, I kept clicking around various categories — “Experiences,” “Retail,” “Sports” — hunting for a perk I could claim. Of the ten current perks, I am only eligible for three. The shame!

And even when I tried to claim my measly three perks, there were problems. After unsuccessfully attempting to get new business cards and a photo album, I clicked on the Red Bull magazine, supposedly open to anyone with a Klout score over 1. Still, no dice.

No Band-Aids for me, either.

Also, the bulk of the perks were all used up.

So what am I missing? Many of the comments were positive, even for the most mundane things, like the Red Bull magazine.“This is the perfect type of digital magazine! Just an awesome design,” said one recipient. So, a lot, maybe.

But not everything was as promised. An eSalon hair coloring perk got particularly bad reviews —“Well, this isn’t a perk because you can get your first color at eSalon FREE and just pay the $5 shipping…it’s actually more. It’s one thing for a Perk to be a discount, but for it to be MORE expensive, I’m actually offended,” groused one commenter.

On the higher end, there were more troubling issues. The priciest perk that I saw were tickets valued at around $2,500 to some kind of London event — you needed to have a God-like Klout score of 70 to qualify for them. (Does God even have a Klout score that high?) At least one man who qualified claims he didn’t receive his perk at all.

Overall, my personal Klout envy aside, the perk program seems pretty disappointing. Most of the prizes were beyond boring (Band-Aids for Canadians?) and unevenly doled out. If you had actual clout — i.e., you command real attention and influence — you probably wouldn’t need Klout to tell you about a Bud Lime summer party. You’d be the person throwing it.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/reyhan/how-internet-famous-do-you-have-to-be-to-get-free

Andaz
The Andaz hotel chain, owned by Hyatt, bucks the trend of expensive minibars by offering free local snacks to guests.

Image: Flickr, Simon Q

Forget traffic jams, the Are we there yet?! whines, and bad weather.

The real headache for many travelers is a quickly-growing list of hotel surcharges, even for items they never use.

Guaranteeing two queen beds or one king bed will cost you, as will checking in early or checking out late. Don’t need the in-room safe? You’re likely still paying. And the overpriced can of soda may be the least of your issues with the hotel minibar.

Vacationers are finding it harder to anticipate the true cost of their stay, especially because many of these charges vary from hotel to hotel, even within the same chain.

Coming out of the recession, the travel industry grew fee-happy. Car rental companies charged extra for services such as electronic toll collection devices and navigation systems. And airlines gained notoriety for adding fees for checking luggage, picking seats in advance, skipping lines at security and boarding early. Hotel surcharges predate the recession, but recently properties have been catching up to the rest of the industry.

“The airlines have done a really nice job of making hotel fees and surcharges seem reasonable,” says Bjorn Hanson, a professor at New York University’s hospitality school.

This year, hotels will take in a record $2.25 billion in revenue from such add-ons, 6% more than in 2013 and nearly double that of a decade ago, according to a new study released Monday by Hanson. Nearly half of the increase can be attributed to new surcharges and hotels increasing the amounts of existing fees.

It’s small in comparison to airlines, which made more than $6 billion in 2013 for checked baggage and itinerary changes, but it will likely continue to grow.

Hanson says guests need to be “extra-attentive” to the fine print. Fewer and fewer services come for free.

Need to check out by noon but don’t have a flight until after dinner? Hotels once stored luggage as a courtesy. Now, a growing number charge $1 or $2 per bag.

Shipping something to the hotel in advance of your trip? There could be a fee for that too. The Hyatt Regency San Antonio, which subcontracts its business center to FedEx Office, charges $10 to $25 to receive a package, depending on weight.

Some budget hotels charge $1.50 a night for in-room safes.

Convincing a front desk employee to waive a fee at check-out is getting harder. Fees are more established, better disclosed and hotel employees are now trained to politely say no.

“It’s the most difficult it’s ever been to get a charge removed,” Hanson says.

U.S. hotels last year took in $122.2 billion in room revenue, according to travel research company STR. Fees only add an extra 2% in revenue, but Hanson notes the majority of that money is pure profit.

Some guests are revolting.

Royce Breckon travels frequently for his job marketing outdoor sporting equipment but refuses to spend the night at any hotel charging for Internet. Charges typically range from $10 to $25 a night.

“You can walk into just about any coffee shop and have it for free,” Breckon says.

The American Hotel and Lodging Association says fees are common in the travel business and that its members disclose them at the time of booking.

Hotels first started adding surcharges in 1997, mostly at resorts with expansive pools, tennis courts and fancy gyms. The so-called resort fees paid for staff to set up beach umbrellas and lounge chairs. Three years later, hotels added energy surcharges to cover rising utility bills.

Hotels then refrained from adding any major surcharge for several years. But as airlines and car rental agencies made fees commonplace, hotels started to think up new ones, collecting record amounts in each of the past four years, according to Hanson’s research.

Even the in-room minibar – a decades-old splurge – isn’t safe from the new wave of add-ons.

At the Liberty Hotel in Boston a cold can of Coke from the minibar costs $5. That’s just the base price. The fine print on the menu reveals an 18% “administrative fee” to restock the bar.

Elsewhere, the in-room offerings are more conspicuous. Jimmy R. Howell was shocked by the W San Diego’s efforts to sell him snacks and drinks.

“Usually these extras are kept under lock and key,” Howell says. At the W, they were “strewn about” the room, above the bar, on the desk, nightstands and in the bathroom. “It seems like an effort to tempt you.”

Any traveler who has picked up a $9 bottle of water on the nightstand thinking it was complimentary will understand.

Even moving an item in the minibar can generate a fee.

The Aria Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, like many other hotels, bills items to guests’ rooms if sensors in the minibar note they have been removed for more than 60 seconds – enough time, hotels say, to read the nutritional information and make a decision.

The Aria goes one step further. It also charges a $25 a day “personal use fee” if a guest puts their own soda or bottled water in the minibar. A guest in need of a mini refrigerator can have one delivered to their room – for an extra $35 a night.

Some hotels — primarily those on the more expensive end — are bucking the trend. Hyatt’s upscale boutique Andaz chain offers complimentary local snacks and non-alcoholic drinks from its minibars.

Hotels are also revisiting resort fees, upping the price, especially at the high-end.

For $650 a night, guests at the St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort — set on a former coconut plantation in Puerto Rico — enjoy rooms with 300-thread-count sheets and walk-in-closets. But that’s not the full price. There’s a $60 nightly resort charge, which provides for a welcome drink upon check-in, Internet access, the use of beach umbrellas and lounge chairs, bicycles and a daily poolside ritual iced tea service that includes fruit skewers. Guests pay whether they use the services or not.

Other hotels are adding mandatory tips.

The Fairmont Southampton in Bermuda, which was recently charging $469 a night, charges a resort fee and mandatory gratuities for each person in a room. So two adults and two kids sharing a room would incur $48.28 a night in resort fees and $40.80 tips — adding 19% to the nightly rate.

And the fees aren’t limited to resorts anymore. The Serrano hotel in downtown San Francisco adds on a $20 per night “Urban Fee” that includes Internet, local phone calls, newspapers, morning coffee and use of bicycles.

Perhaps nowhere are hotels pushing fees further than in Las Vegas. Forget resort fees. Those are taken for granted there. Resorts like The Bellagio are learning from airlines and selling enhancements.

Want to skip the notoriously long Las Vegas check-in lines? That will be $30 extra. Want to check-in early? That’s another $30. Check-out late? Also $30.

And if you want two queen beds or one king bed, it will cost extra to guarantee your preference. For an extra — you guessed it — $30, the Bellagio will lock in three room preferences such as bed type, requests to be near or far away from the elevators, rooms on a high or low floor or the option to have quieter non-connecting rooms.

Then there was the fee Hank Phillippi Ryan, a mystery writer, faced while in town to sign copies of her new book “Truth Be Told” at a convention. Before heading to the airport, she went to the lobby of the Paris Las Vegas Hotel and Casino to print her boarding pass. There a kiosk offered the service — for $7.95.

“I think I actually yelped,” she recalls. “I had never seen that before.”

Additional reporting by Mashable

Read more: http://mashable.com/2014/08/25/hotels-fees/

1. Mardan Palace, Turkey

This stunning pool is located at the Mardan Palace hotel in Antalya, a city on the Mediterranean coast of southwestern Turkey.

2. Alila Villas, Bali

Richard Moross/Creative Commons / Via Flickr: richardmoross

The Alila Villas Uluwatu resort includes a gorgeous infinity pool and an overhanging cliff-side platform with dramatic views over the Indian Ocean.

3. San Alfonso del Mar, Chile

Stewart Cook / Rex USA

San Alfonso holds the current Guinness record as the world’s largest crystalline water pool, with an extension of more than one kilometer in length, eight hectares and 250 million liters of water.

4. Amirandes Grecotel Exclusive Resort, Greece

Styled after the sprawling palaces of the Minoan kings and Venetian nobles who once ruled Crete, Amirandes has the easy elegance of true European Luxury.

5. Springs Resort & Spa, Costa Rica

Las Lagunas offers twelve pools, eight of which are fed directly by water pumped from their Hot Mineral Springs.

6. The Cambrian Hotel, Switzerland

The Cambrian is among the Top 20 Swiss wellness hotels and includes a breathtaking view of the Swiss Alps.

7. Hotel Hacienda Na Xamena, Spain

This Ibizan finca style resort is suspended at 180 meters high at the top of a cliff with panoramic sea views, located in the heart of a preserved natural park.

8. The Grand Mauritian Resort & Spa, Mauritius

This tropical destination is located in Mauritius, an island nation in the Indian Ocean.

9. Ubud Hanging Gardens, Indonesia

Ubud’s infinity-edge swimming pool stands on two levels, perched over the spectacular rain forest.

10. Hotel Caruso, Italy

Found at the highest point of Ravello, this elliptically shaped pool borders a gorgeous view of the sea and mountains.

11. Golden Triangle Resort, Thailand

Robert Stokes/Creative Commons / Via Flickr: stokes

Located in Chiang Rai, this infinity pool offers a unique design and an incredible view.

12. Jade Mountain Resort, St. Lucia

At Jade Mountain, each suite includes an infinity pool overlooking the mountains of St. Lucia.

13. Crocosaurus Cove, Australia

As the only crocodile dive in Australia, Crocosaurus Cove invites thrill-seekers and adventurists to experience the Cage of Death.

14. Huvafen Fushi, Maldives

The Huvafen Fushi hotel is located in Maldives, an island nation in the Indian Ocean. The infinity pools have fiber optic lighting for a truly magical swimming experience.

15. Marina Bay Sands Resort, Singapore

VIVEK PRAKASH / Reuters

The Sands SkyPark infinity pool is 57 stories high and overlooks the Singapore skyline.

16. The Sarojin, Thailand

The luxurious swimming pool at The Sarojin has an infinity edge, jacuzzi lounge area and three drape-shaded pool island pavilions.

17. Elounda Gulf Villas and Suites, Greece

This award-winning luxury villa in Crete, Greece offers a variety of spa pools for a secluded vacationing experience.

18. Capella Pedregal Resort, Mexico

Capella Pedregal, the premier spa resort in Cabo San Lucas, sits on the southernmost tip of Mexico’s Baja California Peninsula.

19. Devil’s Pool, Victoria Falls

Charles Haynes/Creative Commons / Via Flickr: haynes

A naturally formed pool known as the Devil’s Pool is located at Victoria Falls in southern Africa. It peers at the edge of the 355 ft waterfall and is most often visited during the months of September to December.

20. Glenwood Hot Springs, Colorado

The water in Glenwood’s pools have fifteen minerals that help sooth and restore the body of their guests.

21. Golden Nugget, Las Vegas

The Tank at the Golden Nugget provides an exhilarating swimming experience with a secure water slide that tours underwater sea life.

22. The Joule Dallas, Texas

Diorama Sky/Creative Commons / Via Flickr: diorama_sky

Located in Dallas, Texas, The Joule has a rooftop pool that extends over the building, providing a fun view of the city.

23. NEMO33, Belgium

NEMO33 is the deepest indoor swimming pool in the world, with a maximum depth of 113 feet.

24. Blue Palace Resort & Spa, Greece

Blue Palace in Greece features 142 private pools, most of which are infinity style.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/ariellecalderon/amazing-pools-you-need-to-jump-in-before-you-die

Barley, hops, yeast, water, and a whole lot of aggravation.

1. “Is it ready yet?”

"Is it ready yet?"

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Via hedge-walker.tumblr.com

Making a homebrew takes time — usually about a month before it’s ready to drink. So no, the batch that I finished making 2 hours ago isn’t ready.

2. “You know Anheuser-Busch has already perfected this right?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Via monininteressantevie.tumblr.com

If you think that Anheuser-Busch is the pinnacle of beer making, then we probably weren’t going to be friends anyway.

3. “Oh, I love craft beer! Have you ever tried Blue Moon?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Lucasfilm / Via giphy.com

Oh man! You drink wheat beer?! How hipster! Do you know who brews Blue Moon? Take a guess.

4. “Have you ever made a PBR clone?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Via tumblr.com

The ingredients alone are more expensive than buying a case of the stuff. Plus, you want to wait a month to drink a PBR you made? Get out of my house.

5. “Is it ready yet?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Via tumblr.com

People are really impatient.

6. “Wouldn’t it just be easier to buy beer?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Fox / Via giphy.com

Yes, it is! However, homebrewers like to try something different. We’re usually the guys drinking smoked beer, or beer brewed with coffee or brains. We like pushing the envelope. We’re like the Steve Jobs of beer.

7. “Can you make me a watermelon/blueberry/honeysuckle beer?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Via tumblr.com

Look, we love weird requests. And they sometimes work (put peanut butter in it!). But as much as we love trying ingredients we’ve never tried before, some shit just doesn’t work. If you want to see how the flavor profile of a pale ale changes with honeysuckle, maybe you should try brewing it yourself?

8. “Its ok, I’ll just drink it straight from the bottle.”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Via tumblr.com

Oh, that’s fine. Let me know the next time you make a pie. I’ll just cram my face right into the pan, no worries. WOULDN’T WANT TO DIRTY A PLATE!

9. “Have you ever tried a beer with [insert completely random, terrible ingredient idea here]?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Walt Disney Pictures / Via giphy.com

Chances are, if you wouldn’t try cooking with it, I won’t try brewing with it.

10. “Is it ready yet?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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AMC / Via tumblr.com

Really … don’t you have anything better to do?

11. “Hey Walter White? You cooking the blue stuff?”

"Hey Walter White? You cooking the blue stuff?"

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Via craftbeerlibrary.net

Yes, sometimes a serious brew rig looks like it might be able to produce enough blue stuff to keep Arizona tweaking for a decade. But you know how you can tell the difference? Meth doesn’t smell this good.

12. “Can I come over for your next brew day?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Via tumblr.com

Of course you can. Just be ready to stand around and watch me wash/sanitize for hours. Yeah, there’s a lot of standing around.

13. “What do you like better: Coors, Miller, or Bud?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Film4 / Via giphy.com

If you think we’re drinking a Coors while we’re watching a Belgian Tripel mash out, you’re wrong.

14. “What brewery do you work for?”

"What brewery do you work for?"

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Via marriedtothesea.com

You haven’t heard of it, but you will!

*MANIACAL LAUGHTER*

15. “Is it ready yet?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Columbia Pictures / Via exquisitegifs.tumblr.com

You really want to get punched in the face today, don’t you?

16. “Have you ever tried [insert nationally known brewery]?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Via giphy.com

Why no, I’ve never heard of a Samuel Adams Brewery! What do they make? Vice Presidential beer?

17. “Can you make a Bud Light Lime clone?”

"Can you make a Bud Light Lime clone?"

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You really don’t get this whole homebrew thing do you?

18. “Oh yeah, I bought one of those kits online too.”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Via senorgif.com

Do you even know what a hot break is?

19. “Why don’t you make it like 20% ABV!!?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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NBC / Via imperialbedrooms.tumblr.com

At that point, wouldn’t you just want a nice glass of scotch?

20. “I like Miller Lite the best because it’s ‘triple hops brewed.’”

"I like Miller Lite the best because it’s 'triple hops brewed.'"

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Photo Credit: Daniel Piraino via Compfight cc

You obviously have no idea what you’re talking about.

21. “I love that signature beachwood aging flavor you get in Budweiser.”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Touchstone Pictures / Via giphy.com

… I got nothing.

22. “I love Coors because it’s brewed cold and I know so because the mountains are blue!”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Touchstone Pictures / Via tumblr.com

Uh … hey man, is your ear bleeding?

23. “Is it ready yet?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Via tumblr.com

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/justinlehmann/23-things-homebrewers-are-tired-of-hearing-ghjm

Rescuers-throw-bouncing-camera-into-dangerous-places-aa7f6597e4

If Francisco Aguilar and Dave Young get their way, police officers and firefighters will someday carry baseball-shaped, throwable cameras along with the rest of their equipment.

As the founders of Bounce Imaging, Aguilar and Young are developing spherical, camera-laden gadgets that can be tossed into dangerous places—such as the rubble of a building leveled by an earthquake—and then wirelessly relay 360-degree panoramic images of the scene back to a tablet or smartphone.

First responders and military personnel increasingly use technology to scout out places of interest without putting themselves in harm’s way. Often this means using robots capable of crawling into a building or toward a suspect vehicle. iRobot has even developed a compact, throwable reconnaissance robot called FirstLook.

Aguilar and Young, who met as graduate students at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, believe that their device will be easier to operate and cheaper than existing devices. They hope to sell the device for less than $500 initially.

“The idea behind this is, we get it to a point where if you toss it into a room and it’s dangerous to go get it, the unit is essentially disposable,” Aguilar says.

Aguilar came up with the idea for Bounce Imaging’s ball-shaped device while working as a volunteer in Haiti after the country’s devastating earthquake in 2010. While there were some fiber-optic cameras that could be used to search through rubble for survivors, the equipment was expensive and required a skilled operator, he says.

Earlier this year, he started working on Bounce Imaging with Young. They’ve since won $60,000 in funding—$50,000 in prize money from a contest organized by startup accelerator MassChallenge and $10,000 in another contest, the VenCorps NYC Impact Challenge—and are working on a prototype of their first product, which they hope to start testing in January. Several police departments and SWAT units are interested in trying it out, Aguilar says, including MIT’s own police department.

Young, who previously served in the Army in Iraq and Afghanistan, thinks Bounce Imaging’s ball-sized device could be particularly useful for the military. It would be easier to lug around than some of the unwieldy equipment he had to carry while on duty, he says. And, since it’s much cheaper than other imaging tools, it could be abandoned, if necessary.

Others have demonstrated spherical camera systems. For example, researchers at the Technische Universität Berlin built a foam-covered ball with 36 cameras inside that is capable of taking complete panoramas when thrown into the air (see “Eye Ball“).

Bounce Imaging’s device is expected to a weigh half a pound to a pound with a battery inside. It includes six wide-angle cameras that are each surrounded by an infrared LED flash. An external casing protects the components from being crushed on impact and allows the device to bounce.

The cameras can snap pictures every second or half-second, depending on the device’s settings; six pictures will give a full 360-degree view of the scene. An accelerometer and gyroscope help orient images, which are sent wirelessly to an Android-running smartphone or tablet where software stitches the images together.

Young and Aguilar hope to incorporate different sensors into the device for different applications. A firefighter might use one that includes smoke, temperature, and oxygen sensors, for example.

One obvious problem that Bounce Imaging faces is retrieval of its balls—the gadget doesn’t currently include a mechanism to bounce or roll itself back to whomever threw it, so you’d either need to go in and get it or leave it behind. The company may add a tether to allow the user to pull it back, or a beacon that allows the device to be found later on. Aguilar suggests that at some point, the company could even add motion capabilities, like that offered by robotic ball maker Sphero.

This article originally published at MIT Technology Review
here

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/11/08/bounce-imaging/

The world is full of unexplained events and discoveries. People are, naturally, intrigued by unknown occurrences and controversial subjects. The current rise in technological advancement and DNA testing has raised questions in the field of archeology and world history. In many cases, these discoveries have been documented, but information surrounding the artifacts or historical event is hidden behind a wall of mystery. This article will be examining ten historical, theoretical and scientific questions that will make you think. The answers to most of these questions are supported by some scientific research, theory and historical documentation, while others are largely rhetorical. This list is longer than the usual but, as you will see, it really benefits from the extra information.

Nugget  154 A Keseberg Donner Party Cannibal-1

The question: What did Louis Keseberg do?

On April 14, 1846, a group of pioneers known as the Donner Party began their voyage to relocate from the U.S. state of Illinois to California. The trip covered 2,500 miles (4,023 kilometers) over the Great Plains, two mountain ranges and the deserts of the Great Basin. The voyage took between four and six months, but the Donner Party was slowed because they decided to follow a new route called Hastings Cutoff. The group was told that Hastings Cutoff was a shortcut, but, in fact, it was a longer and more treacherous path. Ultimately, 87 people made the journey through the cutoff, which crossed Utah’s Wasatch Mountains and the Great Salt Lake Desert. In all, 37 of the pioneers were members of the Reed and Donner families, while German emigrants Louis and Philippine Keseberg were also traveling with the group.

During the voyage, many of the pioneers documented their daily activities. Louis Keseberg was frequently mentioned in these journals. The connotation surrounding his activates was almost always negative. Louis Keseberg was routinely confronted for abusing his wife and children. Keseberg’s behavior was suspicious to the other travelers and he was regularly accused of theft, malingering and murder. In fact, the Donner Party journals are full of animosity, violent events and war.

After intense snow storms struck the Donner Party, it soon became evident that the group was not going to make it over the mountains before winter. To fend off the cold, all of the families built shelters in the area surrounding Truckee Lake and Alder Creek. By December 13, there was 8 feet (2.4 m) of snow. By the middle of January, most of the group’s food was gone and all that remained was dead human bodies. To stay alive, certain members of the Donner Party began to eat each other. Human bodies were labeled with the names of the deceased and the area became a “Cannibal Camp.”

On February 18, a seven-man rescue party scaled Frémont Pass and reached the Donner camps, which by this time were completely buried in snow. “The first two members of the relief party to enter the camp saw Trudeau carrying a human leg. When they made their presence known, he threw it into a hole with other dismembered bodies.” Twenty-three people were chosen and taken by the rescuers, but the pioneers were weak and some died on the long voyage to California. Dozens of people remained at the Truckee Lake and Alder Creek camp sites. One of these individuals was Louis Keseberg. Little is known about what Keseberg did during this time, but claims have been made that he became a predator.

The final rescue party didn’t reach the camp until April 21, 1847. When they arrived, Louis Keseberg was the only survivor. He was surrounded by dismembered bodies, gallons of blood, and had a fresh pot of human flesh over the fire. The men also found George Donner’s pistols, jewelry and $250 in gold in Keseberg’s cabin. The rescue group threatened to lynch Louis Keseberg, but he was ultimately taken to California. Upon return, Keseberg sued Ned Coffeemeyer for slander and for allegedly spreading stories about his deeds at the Donner camps. Keseberg won his case, but was awarded only $1 in damages. This was evidently all the judicial system felt his reputation was worth. During his lifetime, Louis Keseberg saw over ten of his children die in a number of different ways.

Grapefruit-Juice-Diet

The question: Why Should You Avoid Grapefruit Juice When Taking Certain Drugs?

Many people don’t realize that grapefruit and grapefruit juice has the potential to negatively interact with many drugs and prescribed medications. This happens because the organic compounds in the grapefruit interfere with the intestinal enzyme cytochrome P450 isoform CYP3A4. This causes either an increasing or decreasing bioavailability. The interaction can be witnessed in a number of therapeutic, medical and recreational drugs. Grapefruit juice does not influence injected drugs, only oral substances that undergo first-pass metabolism by the enzyme.

Some of the most common examples of these drugs are a number of sedatives, slow release drugs, ingested marijuana, Codeine, Valium, Norvasc, Pravachol, Cordarone, Viagra, Zoloft, Allegra, and Lipitor. People should not take large amounts of grapefruit while ingesting these medications. When a physician prescribes a specific dose of a drug to a patient, they are working under the assumption that the person will absorb the drug at a specific rate. This calculation is based on the individual’s body type and weight. This information will inform the physician on how much medication to prescribe.

Grapefruit juice has an influence on the enzymes in your gastrointestinal tract that bring food and oral medications into your body. For this reason, grapefruit juice seems to affect both the rate of the drug coming into your body and how quickly it is removed. The end result can be an overdose or an uneven dosage for your size. Grapefruit extends the half life of some drugs, interfering with the body’s ability to break down the substance. The interaction caused by grapefruit compounds lasts for up to 24 hours and the reaction is greatest when the juice is ingested with the drug.

Kokoro-Actroid-1

The question: When will Humans Be Pushed into the Uncanny Valley?

The uncanny valley is a hypothesis regarding the field of robotics and artificial intelligence. The theory holds that when robots, human clones, or computers have characteristics that are similar in appearance to that of humans, it causes a feeling of revulsion and anger. The feeling can be so overwhelming that the person has a need to assault and damage the artificial intelligence. The term has been traced to Ernst Jentsch’s concept of the uncanny, which is a psychological instance where something can be familiar, yet foreign at the same time, resulting in a feeling of it being uncomfortably strange.

For example, if you owned a robot that was human like in appearance and intelligence, the simple fact that it was in your house, staring at you, would make you feel uneasy. Because the uncanny is familiar, yet strange, it often creates cognitive dissonance within the person due to the paradoxical nature of being attracted to, yet repulsed by an object at the same time.

This often leads to an outright rejection of the object. The uncanny valley theory states that as a robot is made more humanlike in its appearance and motion, the emotional response from a human to the robot will become increasingly positive and empathic, until a point is reached and we enter the uncanny valley, beyond which the response quickly becomes that of a strong revulsion. Take a look at the picture of this realistic looking robot and tell me what emotional response you feel.

In many people, it will elicit a strange feeling and reaction. It has been hypothesized that these feelings are due to a biological response that is innate to all humans. As we enter the age of 3D advancement, design studios routinely consider the idea of the uncanny valley. Animation companies follow a set of rules when developing characters, making sure that they do not make them to realistic.

100 Dollar Bill

The question: Who is Behind the Superdollar?

The superdollar, or superbill, refers to a very high quality counterfeit United States $100 bill that has been circulating around the world. After investigations by the United States, Great Britain, China and other world powers, certain crime syndicates and federal governments have been suspected and implemented in creating the notes. The U.S. Government believes that the counterfeit one hundred-dollar bills are most likely being produced in North Korea. However, other possible sources include Iran or criminal gangs operating out of China. Some have even suggested the possibility of an American CIA involvement.

It has been determined that high ranking government officials or organized crime organizations are responsible for the notes because they are extremely high quality and practically intractable. In fact, they are called superdollars because the technology used to create the counterfeit bills is more advanced and superior to the original. The notes are said to be made with the highest quality ink and paper. They are designed to recreate the various security features of United States currency, such as the red and blue security fibers, the security thread, and the watermark. The notes are printed using the intaglio and typographic printing processes.

The United States has based its accusations against North Korea on the accounts of North Korean defectors, who allegedly described the operation, and on South Korean intelligence sources. Certain witnesses have claimed that the factory where the notes are printed is located in the city of Pyongsong, North Korea, and is part of Division 39. The United States government has suggested that the superbills are being distributed by North Korean diplomats and international crime syndicates. In 2004, The U.S. prohibited Americans from banking with Banco Delta Asia. Since that time, the United States has regularly threatened North Korea with sanctions over its alleged involvement with the counterfeit operation.

On February 2, 2006, banks in Japan voluntarily enforced sanctions on Banco Delta Asia identical to those imposed by the U.S. Some have estimated that 1 in 10,000 US$100 bills are counterfeit. The American $100 bill is the most counterfeited currency in the world. To fight the abuse, the U.S. government has developed a new $100 bill that is more secure. The new design has a complex printing process and holds a new 3D blue security stripe. The bills were initially set to be released in early 2011, but the U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve suffered a major setback when 1.1 billion new one hundred-dollar bills were printed with a flaw. The release of the new $100 bill has been pushed back until the printing problem can be fixed.

Homo Floresiensis-Wikimedia-Ryan-Somma

The question: Did Miniature Humans Populate Earth 12,000 Years Ago?

In 2003, a team of Australian-Indonesian archaeologists made a remarkable discovery in Liang Bua Cave, which is located on the Island of Flores, in East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. The group was searching for evidence of the original human migration when they discovered a collection of unusual hominoid bones and artifacts. Partial skeletons of nine individuals were unearthed, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the subject of intense research and debate as they appear to have human features, but are miniature in size.

This has caused some scientists to claim that the bones represent a species distinct from modern humans. The new species has been labeled Homo floresiensis (nicknamed Hobbit). The hominoid is noted for its small body and brain size and for its relatively recent survival. Recovered alongside the skeletal remains were stone tools from archaeological horizons ranging from 94,000 to 13,000 years ago. Some of the tools are sophisticated stone implements. The artifacts are all of the size considered appropriate for a 1-meter-tall human population.

Archaeologist Mike Morwood and his colleagues have proposed that a variety of features, both primitive and derived, identify these bones as belonging to a new species. A study of the bones and joints of the arm, shoulder and lower limbs concluded that H. floresiensis was more similar to early humans and apes than modern humans. Some less obvious features that might distinguish H. floresiensis from modern Homo sapiens is the form of the teeth, and the lesser angle in the head of the humerus (upper arm bone). Each of these distinguishing examples has been heavily scrutinized by certain members of the scientific community.

Aside from a smaller body size, the overall specimen seems to resemble Homo erectus. Additional features used to argue for the discovery of a new population of previously unidentified hominids include the absence of a chin, the relatively low twist of the arm bones, and the thickness of the creature’s leg bones. The feet of H. floresiensis are unusually flat in relation to the rest of the body. As a result, when walking, the creature would have to bend its knees further back than modern people do. For this reason, it was not able to move very fast.

The species toes have an unusual shape and the big toe is very short. Local geology suggests that a volcanic eruption on the Island of Flores approximately 12,000 years ago could have been responsible for the demise of H. floresiensis, along with other local fauna, including the elephant species Stegodon. In early December of 2004, paleoanthropologist Teuku Jacob removed most of the Hobbit remains from their repository. The priceless artifacts were damaged upon return. The only pelvis was smashed, ultimately destroying details that reveal body shape, gait and evolutionary history.

Aedes-Mosquito-1

The question: Why are Humans Creating and Releasing Genetically Modified Mosquitoes?

Operation Drop Kick was a 1956 U.S. entomological warfare field testing program that modified and deployed the yellow fever mosquito. The goal of the project was to use the mosquito to carry and release a biological warfare agent. The concept was simply to drop a large collection of diseased mosquitoes over a populated area. Operation Drop Kick included a 1956 test in Savannah, Georgia, where uninfected mosquitoes were released in a residential neighborhood, and another 1956 test in Avon Park, Florida, where 600,000 diseased mosquitoes were released on the city.

Between the years 1956-1957, several U.S. Army biological warfare experiments were conducted in the city of Avon Park. In the experiments, Army biological weapon researchers released millions of mosquitoes on the town in order to see if the insects would spread yellow fever and dengue fever. The residents of Avon Park were not notified of the deadly experiments. Hundreds of residents contracted a wide array of illnesses, including fevers, respiratory problems, stillbirths, encephalitis and typhoid. Army researchers pretended to be public health workers, so that they could photograph and perform medical tests on the victims. Several people died as a result of the program.

The experiments in Avon Park were concentrated in low-income neighborhoods, in areas that were predominantly black with newly constructed housing projects. In 1978, a Pentagon document titled, Biological Warfare: Secret Testing & Volunteers revealed that similar experiments were conducted in Key West, Florida. Many people have raised the question of why the U.S. government was playing around with the Dengue fever virus. Dengue fever is an infectious disease that causes a number of symptoms, including severe headaches, a petechial rash and muscle and joint pains. In a small proportion the disease progresses to life-threatening complications. Since the middle of the 1950s, the rates of Dengue fever infection have increased dramatically, with approximately 50-100 million people being infected yearly. The disease has become a global epidemic in more than 110 countries with 2.5 billion people living in areas where it is prevalent.

In 2009, the British biotechnology giant Oxitec announced that they had developed a genetically-modified (GM) mosquito (OX513A) that, apart from a specific chemical antibiotic, is unable to successfully repopulate. After intense media scrutiny, the company gave a statement which indicated that the GM mosquitoes may help fight the spread of dengue fever by reducing or eliminating the wild mosquito population. In 2009, Oxitec released millions of the OX513A test mosquitoes over the Cayman Islands. Many people have questioned the decision to fight the spread of Dengue fever by using more infected mosquitoes. Nobody knows for sure what will happen when the new GM mosquitoes interact with animals and human life, or how the mosquitoes altered genes will disrupt the environment.

20051218025923!Gods Whores-Ml560

The question: How did David Berg Convince Women that Flirty Fishing was Acceptable?

In 1968, a man named David Berg developed a new religious movement named the Children of God. The group devoted their time to spreading the message of Jesus’ love and salvation. With the enforcement of strict regulations, David Berg preached about the de-Christianization and decay of moral values in Western society. He viewed the trends towards a New World Order as setting the stage for the rise of the Antichrist. Remarkably, Berg lived in seclusion, communicating with his followers and the public via nearly 3,000 Mo Letters.

In the 1970s, the Children of God began to expand to all areas of the world. David Berg discussed a message of salvation, apocalypticism, and spiritual revolution against the outside world, which the members called the System. The group’s liberal stance on sexuality led to concerns and investigations regarding child abuse. However, the most publicized practice organized by David Berg and the Children of God was named Flirty Fishing. Flirty Fishing is a form of religious prostitution that was practiced by the Children of God from 1974-1987. The term refers to Matthew 4:19 from the New Testament, in which Jesus tells two fishermen that he will make them “fishers of men.”

Cult leader David Berg extrapolated from this that women in his movement should be flirty fishers, with the targeted men being called “fish.” The cult published several documents with instructions for young women. Flirty Fishing was defined as using sex appeal for proselytizing. If masturbation, oral, or penetrative sex ensued, this was termed as “loving sexually” and counted as more brownie points within the group. The Children of God claimed that the purpose of Flirty Fishing was for women to show God’s love to men, to win converts for the group, and to garner material and financial support.

The cult members regularly lived in communes, traveled around the world and spent their time proselytizing rather than earning a regular income. For this reason the financial aspect of Flirty Fishing soon became dominant. The cult used the practice to curry favors with local men of influence such as business men, politicians or police. Women who objected to being what the cult itself blatantly described as “God’s whores” or “hookers for Jesus” were admonished not to “let self and pride enter in.” They were continually reminded that their body didn’t really belong to them as according to 1 Corinthians 6:19–20. Many of the Flirty Fishers had boyfriends or were married, or had children.

In family publications, Flirty Fishers and Escort Services frequently reported that they found their work hard, dangerous and exhausting. The financial benefit of Flirty Fishing quickly led to a regular Escort Servicing (ESing) operation within the cult. The Children of God practiced Flirty Fishing and Escort Servicing from 1974 until 1987, when it was officially abandoned, partially because of the AIDS epidemic. During this time, the women were expected to keep an exact record of their “fruits.” A 1988 statistic showed that more than 223,000 men had been “fished.” The cult generally discouraged birth control and for this reason many of the ladies became pregnant. Among the Children of God organization (today’s Family International), the unwed children were labeled Jesus babies.

Roopkund-Skeleton-Lake

The question: Who Died at Skeleton Lake?

One of the greatest mysteries of the Himalayas is a small glacial lake named Roopkund. The lake is located in the Uttarakhand state of India, at an altitude of about 5,029 meters (16,499 feet). The area surrounding the lake is completely uninhabited and the water is a five day treacherous hike from civilization. In 1942, Roopkund gained the name Skeleton Lake when over five hundred human skulls, bones and artifacts were discovered surrounding and inside the ice. These human bones have baffled scientists for decades because historians don’t understand who these people were or what they were doing so high in the mountains. Roopkund was never a historically significant region and no traces of any trade routes to Tibet have been found.

The documentary Skeleton Lake, made by the National Geographic Channel, claimed that Roopkund was the venue for the Garhwali religious festival called Nanda Jaat yatra, which is held every 12 years, but facts supporting this claim are limited. It was originally believed by specialists that the people died from an epidemic, landslide or blizzard, but after an archaeological team examined the site in 2004, it was determined that the skulls contained severe head trauma. Based on this evidence it has been hypothesized that the people died from a sudden hailstorm. It has been suggested that the hailstones were as large as tennis balls, and with no shelter in the open Himalayas, all of the people perished in the storm.

Probably the most remarkable discovery came after scientists conducted DNA tests on the bones, which proved to have a rich source of DNA material. The bodies were dated to AD 850 with a possible mistake up to 30 years. This date was 600 years earlier than initially reported. Remarkably, the experts have found that the dead individuals belonged to two different teams. One team is marked by a shorter stature of the skeletons, while the other human bones are significantly taller. The recorded DNA genetic mutations have caught the attention of the scientific community. It remains unclear exactly who these people were? What they looked like or why they were traveling in this remote area of the Himalayas?

Lake Toba-1

The question: How many Humans were Left on Earth after the Toba Supereruption?

Lake Toba is the largest volcanic lake in the world. It is located in the middle of the northern part of the Indonesian island of Sumatra, with a surface elevation of about 900 meters (2,953 ft). Lake Toba is the site of a supervolcanic eruption that occurred 69,000-77,000 years ago. The event was followed by a massive climate change on Earth. The eruption is believed to have had a VEI intensity of 8, and is thought to be the largest explosive eruption anywhere on Earth in the last 25 million years. The eruption took place in Indonesia, but it deposited an ash layer approximately 15 centimeters thick over the entirety of South Asia.

Since the discovery of the catastrophe, a wide range of theories have been studied and proposed hypothesizing on how large the explosion was and how it impacted the human population on Earth. The Toba catastrophe theory is an idea that was developed and has been supported by various anthropologists and archeologists. The theory suggests that the Lake Toba volcanic eruption had a massive global consequence on Earth, killing almost all humans and creating a population bottleneck in Central Eastern Africa and India. The theory holds that the Lake Toba supervolcanic event plunged the planet into a 6-to-10-year volcanic winter, which resulted in the world’s human population being reduced to 10,000 or even a mere 1,000 breeding pairs, creating a noticeable effect in human evolution.

It has been argued that the Toba eruption produced not only a catastrophic volcanic winter but also an additional 1,000 year cooling episode. The Toba event is the most closely studied supereruption in history. In 1993, science journalist Ann Gibbons first suggested a link between the eruption and a bottleneck in human evolution. According to the bottleneck theory, genetic evidence suggests that all humans alive today, despite an apparent variety, are descended from a very small population, perhaps between 1,000 to 10,000 breeding pairs about 70,000 years ago. The theory suggests that the volcanic eruption isolated and eliminated entire groups of people, causing worldwide vegetation destruction and severe drought in the tropical rainforest belt.

The Lake Toba supereruption may have caused modern human races to differentiate abruptly only 70,000 years ago, rather than gradually over one million years. However, this theory is largely debated in the world of archeology. Modern research conducted by archaeologist Michael Petraglia and other scientists has cast major doubt on the Toba catastrophic theory. We do understand that a major human migration occurred during this time in history. Recent analyses of mitochondrial DNA have set the estimate for the migration from Africa at 60,000–70,000 years ago, which is in line with the dating of the Toba eruption. During the subsequent tens of thousands of years, the descendants of these migrants populated Australia, East Asia, Europe and, finally, the Americas.

Adolf Hitler

The question: How would your Life be Different if Adolf Hitler Died in 1936?

The Second World War changed the landscape of human life on Earth. In January of 1933, the ailing German leader Paul von Hindenburg appointed Adolf Hitler as the Chancellor of Germany. Paul von Hindenburg passed various legislative acts that suspended German civil liberties and gave Hitler administrative control over the entire country. In 1933, the era of Nazi Germany began and Hitler laid out plans for world conquest. Adolf Hitler was a master of deception and media propaganda. In 1934, he began to display the message “One people, One Germany, One Führer.” Hitler made sure to trick foreign powers into thinking that Germany was a safe place to live. In fact, Adolf Hitler was named the U.S. Time Magazine person of the year in 1938.

During this time in German history, Adolf Hitler took control over the youth. He passed laws that forced German teachers to use Nazi propaganda. German children were taught to despise Jewish people and to show all loyalty to the Third Reich. He organized a program called Hitler’s Youth, which recruited all kids over the age of nine years. Between the years 1936-1938, over 8 million German children took part in Hitler’s Youth oath of allegiance. In 1935, Hitler passed the first laws against the Jewish population. He ordered that all Jewish people were no longer German citizens. Marriage and sexual intercourse between Germans and Jews was outlawed. At this time, Hitler pushed thousands of white Arian German women into pregnancy. He demanded that teenage girls attend Nuremberg rally camps, where they had sexual intercourse with boys and became pregnant. In 1936, nine hundred girls came home from the Nuremberg rally pregnant. Unwed mothers were knows as the Führer’s brides.

In 1938, Hitler annexed Austria under Nazi rule. This was accomplished because Mussolini’s Fascist Italy made an alliance with the Third Reich and no longer was protecting Austria. Many people welcomed Hitler into Austria, but within days of the move, 70,000 Austrians were sent to concentration camps. During the Second World War German armies occupied most of Europe. Nazi forces defeated France, took Norway, invaded Yugoslavia and Greece and occupied much of the European portion of the Soviet Union. Germany also forged alliances with Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria and, later, Finland, and collaborated with individuals in several other nations.

Hitler’s decision to launch Operation Barbarossa and attack the Soviet Union turned the tide of war. Had Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin remained in alliance how would your life be different today? Would the United States nuclear technology have been used in the European Theatre of World War II? How much influence could one man, Adolf Hitler, really have on the rise of the Third Reich in Germany? All of these questions should be considered when examining your ancestry and this dark time in human history.

Read more: http://listverse.com/2011/01/10/10-questions-to-make-you-think/