I love acronyms and here are a few for today!

Positive Energy – Fuels The Spirit – Enhances Business
Unconditional Love – Lead with firm compassion and understanding
Skill – Always grow to be the Best Of The Greatest
Help – If you help enough others get what they want you will get what you want – Zig Ziglar

Mechanic – Get the best, Tools, People, Assets
Operations – Good Systems and Procedures Make for Good business
Research – Know your product and Market – Who What When Where Why and How
Expansion – Growth = Success = Profit

Faithful                                                     Get
Reliable                                                     Our
Independent                                             Actions
Enterprising                                              Linked to
Noble                                                         Success
Dependable
Supportive

Yes                          No is—–              Not
Expansion                                            Optional!
Succeeds

Game shows came of age toward the end of the Great Depression, and for good reason. People were so hard up for money that the lure of cash and prizes drew in audiences like nothing else. In some ways, the game show can be seen as the precursor to the reality show, taking ordinary folks and immersing them in a world of possibility. But like most forms of entertainment, game shows have their bizarre and sordid side.

10 The Intercept

car chase

Grand Theft Auto is one of the most popular video game franchises in the world, but one can immediately see serious logistical problems in adapting it to a game show setting. Leave it to the Russians to put this concept on wheels. The Intercept was a game show in which contestants were instructed to steal a car.

Once they were on the road, they had to evade the show’s police force for 35 minutes. If they could escape, they were given the car as a prize. Of course, winning was nearly impossible—the cars were outfitted with tracking devices, making staying ahead of the police a true miracle.

9 Man vs. Beast

boxing-kangaroo

In 2003, Fox aired Man vs. Beast, a show that consisted of people competing (and largely losing) against animals in different events, including an eating contest between former Nathan’s Hot Dog champion Takeru Kobayashi and a half-ton Kodiak bear. The most distasteful competition occurred between 44 dwarfs and an Asian elephant in an airplane-pulling race.

The only event clearly dominated by man was an obstacle course race between a US Navy SEAL and a chimpanzee. The SEAL, Scott Helvenston, wouldn’t have long to celebrate his victory though. The following year, he started as a contractor for the private security firm Blackwater and became the victim of one of the most savage acts of violence in the Iraq War. His team was ambushed by insurgents, torched, butchered, and dragged through the streets.

8 The Price Is Right

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Each episode of The Price Is Right concludes with two finalists guessing the price of a showcase, an assembly of big-ticket items like cars, furniture, and vacations. The contestant who guesses close enough to the actual price (without going over) wins.

For the most part, it’s an inexact science. But on September 22, 2008, contestant Terry Kneiss blew everyone away when he buzzed in with the exact amount of his showcase ($23,743), which consisted of a billiards table, a karaoke machine, and a 17-foot camper. Carey’s reaction was noticeably deadpan, as he feared yet another game show scandal might have been in the works.

However, Kneiss hadn’t cheated; a longtime viewer of the show, he merely noticed that many of the items were repeatedly featured. He memorized the prices of many items, and fortunately, those appeared in his showcase. And the $743? That was a fluke. Kneiss randomly used his PIN number.

7 Jeopardy!

pardy

Quiz show Jeopardy! is perhaps best known for the 2004 reign of Ken Jennings, a Mormon genius featured on 75 episodes of the show, until losing on the Final Jeopardy answer “Most of this firm’s 70,000 seasonal white-collar employees work only four months a year.” Jennings responded “What is Fed-Ex?” but the correct question was “What is H&R Block?”

In response to the kind of advertising that money couldn’t buy, H&R Block granted Jennings free tax preparations and financial advice for life. He would go on to appear in several more Jeopardy! tournaments, including one against IBM “artificial intelligence” supercomputer Watson (who beat him soundly).

However, winning Jeopardy! is only a matter of having the most money of three contestants. While Jennings often triumphed by tens of thousands of dollars, in 1993, Air Force lieutenant colonel Darryl Scott won a game with a score of $1. In case you’re wondering, the maximum amount one can win in a single game, provided you answer every question correctly, land on the Daily Double questions last in each round, and bet the maximum amount in Final Jeopardy is $566,400.

6 Wheel Of Fortune

wheel

Wheel of Fortune, which generally airs right before Jeopardy!, tends to aim at a less academic audience, with contestant auditions that rely less on intelligence than personality. Amiable host Pat Sajak runs the show while statuesque cougar (she’s 56!) Vanna White manipulates the electronic letter board.

Today, players can win hundreds of thousands of dollars, cars, and exotic vacations, but back in the 1980s, the show was “boring” according to Sajak. Instead of competing to win cash, players won symbolic funds which could be used to buy lame prizes like appliances. In 2012, Sajak admitted that the format took so long to film that he and Vanna used to sneak off for margarita-fueled dinners at a nearby restaurant. He claimed he and Vanna would have “two or three or six” margaritas before returning to the set, where they would “have trouble recognizing the alphabet”.

5 Family Feud

family fued

Family Feud premiered in 1976 and was hosted by Richard Dawson, a charming Englishman known for kissing the female contestants. Dawson was succeeded by Ray Combs, a somewhat-forgettable figure who hosted the show for six years. He was infamous for walking off the set after the final episode without even saying goodbye to anyone. In 1994, he was in a car accident that left him with permanent, painful spinal damage.

His career stalled, he suffered financial setbacks (including the foreclosure of his home), and he and his wife filed for divorce. Combs became psychotic, spending time in the hospital after a suicide attempt. Upon his release, he proceeded to destroy the inside of his home and smash his head into the walls. Police were summoned and took him to the Glendale Adventist Medical Center in Glendale, California to be evaluated. The next day, he hanged himself in the closet of his hospital room with his bedsheets. He was just 40 years old.

4 Press Your Luck

press

Press Your Luck was a mid-1980s game show that was part quiz show and part “dumb luck.” Contestants played against an illuminated game board that lit up prizes in different patterns, and they could stop it at any time to win the cash or prizes it landed on.

If they stopped the board on a “Whammy” (a caricature of a villain), they would lose everything. It all seemed entirely random until 1984—when unemployed ice cream truck driver Michael Larson appeared on the show and begun to run the board, playing 45 rounds in a row before striking out. His turn went on so long that it had to be incorporated into two episodes of the show.

Larson won an improbable fortune of $110,237. An investigation by CBS found that he had been using the stop-motion function on his VCR to painstakingly review episodes of the show. He realized that the random illumination of the game board actually worked in a predictable sequence. They determined this was not cheating and gave Michael Larson the prize money, but they made sure to reprogram the game board so that no one could duplicate the stunt.

3 Amaan Ramazan

ramazan

Amaan Ramazan is a Pakistani game show where guests are presented with prizes like laptops, smartphones, and land deeds for correctly answering questions about Islam.

Hosted by the lively Aamir Liaquat Hussain, one of the most famous television personalities in the country, the show has been criticized by opponents for doing wild stunts in the name of ratings. But during the 2013 holy month of Ramadan (which ran from July 9 to August 7), a time when shows in the Islamic world fight for ratings, Hussain unveiled his most audacious stunt yet: He gave away orphaned babies.

Although it appeared on the show that the babies were given away as prizes, the families were approved and fully vetted beforehand. Although this may seem like a controversial move, Amaan Ramazan may have actually saved these children’s lives. Babies are abandoned in Pakistan frequently, especially girls, who are seen by many as less desirable.

2 Cash Cab

cash cab

Cash Cab is a quiz show in which a cab driver lobs increasingly difficult trivia questions at taxi passengers while driving them to their destination. It has a three-strikes rule that dumps you on the sidewalk if you rack up three wrong answers during your ride.

The Canadian version of the show endured an ugly scandal in 2011, when the Cash Cab struck and killed a 61-year-old pedestrian in Vancouver, British Columbia. Fortunately for the fate of the show, the accident did not occur during filming, but later in the day when one of the show’s producers was bringing the cab back to a garage for the night.

There have been more than two dozen international versions of the program throughout the world. The American version went off the air in 2012.

1 Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?

millionaire

Who Wants To Be a Millionaire is notable for its “lifelines,” which contestants can use to seek help with a particularly tricky question. Although the lifelines have evolved somewhat throughout the run of the series, two of the common choices were “phone-a-friend” and “ask the audience.” Objectively, the best “phone-a-friend” moment occurred on November 19, 1999, when John Carpenter called his father while answering the million-dollar question. Carpenter didn’t need help—he just wanted to tell his dad he was going to win. And he did, becoming the first million-dollar winner in the US version of the show.

In “ask the audience,” the audience is prompted to provide their answer to the question, usually leaving the contestant with a clear majority choice. In the American version of the show, this is typically the correct answer. However, audiences in international renditions of the show can be quite fickle, instead choosing to troll the contestant and provide the wrong answer intentionally. This has been observed in the French version, and especially in the Russian version.

Read more: http://listverse.com/2013/09/11/10-weird-facts-about-game-shows/

2. Dogbrella

Otherwise known as a broken umbrella.

4. Darth Vader iPhone Charger

11. Baby Seal Taser

13. Under-the-sheets Fan

15. Louis Vuitton Waffle Maker

17. (because it deserves another photo)

18. Bookshelf Chair

19. Shark pillow/suffocator

21. Waffsicle Maker

22. DIY Ostrich Pillow

23. Plastic Bag Holder?

24. Body Sleeping Bag

25. Coffee Holder Umbrella

27. Keyboard Sandals

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/atmccann/31-reasons-pinterest-is-the-new-skymall

Absentmindedly (sorry, obsessively) checking my Klout score this morning, I stumbled upon a perk — a shiny ad for some kind of new Starbucks drink offered to the uber-influencers of the influence-counting service. A perk! I love perks.

Klout perks have been around for a couple years, and they’re no joke, even if you think the service is: upgrades to a first class lounge at SFO, VIP access at a Hollywood nightclub, deeper discounts on Gilt and more. One guy, as of May, had collected 63 perks, including a phone and an invitation to a VH1 awards show. In June, Klout bragged it has delivered 700,000 perks across 350 campaigns.

Unfortunately, as soon as I clicked on the Starbucks perk for my free drink, my heart sank.

It seems that my Klout score of 59 was just not high enough to meet their bar of influence, a Klout score of 60. I am not influential enough to be worthy of a Starbucks Refresher. Surely, there were things I could qualify for, though? I mean, I’m not INVISIBLE. I have INFLUENCE. I’m not the most powerful person in the Kloutworld (scores go up to 100) but I’m certainly average or better. Can’t I at least pick up a pass to a Bud Lime party?

NOPE. To be fair, it seems that the party already happened, and it happened in Chicago and Washington, DC. I am in San Francisco.

Increasingly desperate to prove my Klout self-worth and validate my Kloutsistence with perks, though, I kept clicking around various categories — “Experiences,” “Retail,” “Sports” — hunting for a perk I could claim. Of the ten current perks, I am only eligible for three. The shame!

And even when I tried to claim my measly three perks, there were problems. After unsuccessfully attempting to get new business cards and a photo album, I clicked on the Red Bull magazine, supposedly open to anyone with a Klout score over 1. Still, no dice.

No Band-Aids for me, either.

Also, the bulk of the perks were all used up.

So what am I missing? Many of the comments were positive, even for the most mundane things, like the Red Bull magazine.“This is the perfect type of digital magazine! Just an awesome design,” said one recipient. So, a lot, maybe.

But not everything was as promised. An eSalon hair coloring perk got particularly bad reviews —“Well, this isn’t a perk because you can get your first color at eSalon FREE and just pay the $5 shipping…it’s actually more. It’s one thing for a Perk to be a discount, but for it to be MORE expensive, I’m actually offended,” groused one commenter.

On the higher end, there were more troubling issues. The priciest perk that I saw were tickets valued at around $2,500 to some kind of London event — you needed to have a God-like Klout score of 70 to qualify for them. (Does God even have a Klout score that high?) At least one man who qualified claims he didn’t receive his perk at all.

Overall, my personal Klout envy aside, the perk program seems pretty disappointing. Most of the prizes were beyond boring (Band-Aids for Canadians?) and unevenly doled out. If you had actual clout — i.e., you command real attention and influence — you probably wouldn’t need Klout to tell you about a Bud Lime summer party. You’d be the person throwing it.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/reyhan/how-internet-famous-do-you-have-to-be-to-get-free

Imagine rocking up to a party in a flying car. That’d be the dream. The idea has been around for a while now and we’ve been teased with futuristic designs many times, but it seemed unlikely that we’d be cruising around in our own batmobiles any time soon. But a Slovakia-based company is now tantalizingly close to making our childhood dreams a reality, having developed a fully functional prototype.

AeroMobil unveiled their car/plane hybrid, AeroMobil 3.0, at the Pioneers Festival in Vienna on October 29. They boasted that their swanky flying roadster only took 10 months to produce, which is pretty impressive to say the least.

Like a transformer, the limousine-sized vehicle can morph from plane to car with the touch of a button, in just two minutes. When the wings are folded, it could easily fit into existing road infrastructure. What’s more, it runs on gasoline instead of kerosene, so owners can fill them up at regular gas stations.

In car form, it can reach speeds of 160 km/h, and as a plane it can travel at 200 km/h. To be used as a plane, all that is required is 250 meters of runway or grass for takeoff, and 50 meters for landing. It’s small enough to be stored in a garage, too, so no need for a hangar. Because it’s so annoying when you have to store your private jet away from home, of course.

Aeromobil.

Unfortunately, a normal driver’s license isn’t enough to be able to drive this thing. It’s the equivalent of a light-sport aircraft, so you’d need to get a sport pilot license.

Pilots have been testing out the vehicle since October this year, but it still needs some tinkering. Although it’s very close to the final product, which will be made using the same materials, the team won’t give us any ideas on when it will likely arrive on the market.

“There’s a lot of things before us,” AeroMobil CCO Stefan Vadocz told Motherboard, “but we will be working hard to do those as efficiently as possible to bring the vehicle to the market.”

Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/technology/awesome-flying-car-prototype-unveiled

1. Legend has it a 9th-century Ethiopian goat herder discovered coffee by accident when he noticed how crazy the beans were making his goats.

2. New Yorkers drink almost 7 times more coffee than other cities in the US.

3. Coffee is a psychoactive. And at high doses it can make you see things… It can also kill you…

4. The lethal dose of caffeine is roughly 100 cups of coffee.

5. A French doctor in the 1600s suggested Cafe Au Laits for patients, inspiring people to begin adding milk to coffee.

6. The French philosopher Voltaire is said to have drank 50 cups of coffee a day. Because he ruled.

7. Espresso is regulated by the Italian government because it is considered an essential part of their daily life

8. Hawaii is the only state that commercially grows coffee. And this is what it looks like:

9. In the ancient Arab culture there was only one way a woman could legally divorce: If her husband didn’t provide enough coffee.

10. Coffee beans are actually the pit of a berry, which makes them a fruit. The best fruit.

11. IMPORTANT TO KNOW: Brewed espresso has 2.5% fat, while filtered coffee contains 0.6% fat.

12. Johan Sebastian Bach wrote an opera about a woman who was addicted to coffee.

13. We’re not going to tell you how, but there is a way to brew coffee with marijuana in it and it is described as producing a “dreamy” kind of coffee buzz.

14. Unlike the hip 20-something Baristas in the US, in Italy the average Barista age is 48, and it is a very respected profession.

15. Want to know the history of the word “coffee”? Well here it is:

16. In the 1600s there was a controversy over whether or not Catholics could drink coffee, luckily Pope Clement VIII said it was okay.

17. No matter what people tell you, caffeine cannot help you sober up.

18. The first webcam was invented at The University of Cambridge to let people know if the coffee pot was full or not.

19. There is a spa in Japan that lets you bathe in coffee, tea, or wine. I wouldn’t drink it though…

20. This is the most expensive drink at Starbucks: $23.50, with 16 shots of espresso or 1400mg of caffeine.

21. Before coffee caught on in the US in the 1700s, beer was breakfast drink of choice. Which is only slightly less awesome.

22. Irish coffee was actually invented to warm up cold American plane passengers leaving from Ireland.

23. And lastly, Teddy Roosevelt is and was the greatest American coffee drinker, consuming a gallon a day. But you probably shouldn’t attempt to do that.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/ryanhatesthis/23-facts-about-coffee-the-worlds-most-important

Andaz
The Andaz hotel chain, owned by Hyatt, bucks the trend of expensive minibars by offering free local snacks to guests.

Image: Flickr, Simon Q

Forget traffic jams, the Are we there yet?! whines, and bad weather.

The real headache for many travelers is a quickly-growing list of hotel surcharges, even for items they never use.

Guaranteeing two queen beds or one king bed will cost you, as will checking in early or checking out late. Don’t need the in-room safe? You’re likely still paying. And the overpriced can of soda may be the least of your issues with the hotel minibar.

Vacationers are finding it harder to anticipate the true cost of their stay, especially because many of these charges vary from hotel to hotel, even within the same chain.

Coming out of the recession, the travel industry grew fee-happy. Car rental companies charged extra for services such as electronic toll collection devices and navigation systems. And airlines gained notoriety for adding fees for checking luggage, picking seats in advance, skipping lines at security and boarding early. Hotel surcharges predate the recession, but recently properties have been catching up to the rest of the industry.

“The airlines have done a really nice job of making hotel fees and surcharges seem reasonable,” says Bjorn Hanson, a professor at New York University’s hospitality school.

This year, hotels will take in a record $2.25 billion in revenue from such add-ons, 6% more than in 2013 and nearly double that of a decade ago, according to a new study released Monday by Hanson. Nearly half of the increase can be attributed to new surcharges and hotels increasing the amounts of existing fees.

It’s small in comparison to airlines, which made more than $6 billion in 2013 for checked baggage and itinerary changes, but it will likely continue to grow.

Hanson says guests need to be “extra-attentive” to the fine print. Fewer and fewer services come for free.

Need to check out by noon but don’t have a flight until after dinner? Hotels once stored luggage as a courtesy. Now, a growing number charge $1 or $2 per bag.

Shipping something to the hotel in advance of your trip? There could be a fee for that too. The Hyatt Regency San Antonio, which subcontracts its business center to FedEx Office, charges $10 to $25 to receive a package, depending on weight.

Some budget hotels charge $1.50 a night for in-room safes.

Convincing a front desk employee to waive a fee at check-out is getting harder. Fees are more established, better disclosed and hotel employees are now trained to politely say no.

“It’s the most difficult it’s ever been to get a charge removed,” Hanson says.

U.S. hotels last year took in $122.2 billion in room revenue, according to travel research company STR. Fees only add an extra 2% in revenue, but Hanson notes the majority of that money is pure profit.

Some guests are revolting.

Royce Breckon travels frequently for his job marketing outdoor sporting equipment but refuses to spend the night at any hotel charging for Internet. Charges typically range from $10 to $25 a night.

“You can walk into just about any coffee shop and have it for free,” Breckon says.

The American Hotel and Lodging Association says fees are common in the travel business and that its members disclose them at the time of booking.

Hotels first started adding surcharges in 1997, mostly at resorts with expansive pools, tennis courts and fancy gyms. The so-called resort fees paid for staff to set up beach umbrellas and lounge chairs. Three years later, hotels added energy surcharges to cover rising utility bills.

Hotels then refrained from adding any major surcharge for several years. But as airlines and car rental agencies made fees commonplace, hotels started to think up new ones, collecting record amounts in each of the past four years, according to Hanson’s research.

Even the in-room minibar – a decades-old splurge – isn’t safe from the new wave of add-ons.

At the Liberty Hotel in Boston a cold can of Coke from the minibar costs $5. That’s just the base price. The fine print on the menu reveals an 18% “administrative fee” to restock the bar.

Elsewhere, the in-room offerings are more conspicuous. Jimmy R. Howell was shocked by the W San Diego’s efforts to sell him snacks and drinks.

“Usually these extras are kept under lock and key,” Howell says. At the W, they were “strewn about” the room, above the bar, on the desk, nightstands and in the bathroom. “It seems like an effort to tempt you.”

Any traveler who has picked up a $9 bottle of water on the nightstand thinking it was complimentary will understand.

Even moving an item in the minibar can generate a fee.

The Aria Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, like many other hotels, bills items to guests’ rooms if sensors in the minibar note they have been removed for more than 60 seconds – enough time, hotels say, to read the nutritional information and make a decision.

The Aria goes one step further. It also charges a $25 a day “personal use fee” if a guest puts their own soda or bottled water in the minibar. A guest in need of a mini refrigerator can have one delivered to their room – for an extra $35 a night.

Some hotels — primarily those on the more expensive end — are bucking the trend. Hyatt’s upscale boutique Andaz chain offers complimentary local snacks and non-alcoholic drinks from its minibars.

Hotels are also revisiting resort fees, upping the price, especially at the high-end.

For $650 a night, guests at the St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort — set on a former coconut plantation in Puerto Rico — enjoy rooms with 300-thread-count sheets and walk-in-closets. But that’s not the full price. There’s a $60 nightly resort charge, which provides for a welcome drink upon check-in, Internet access, the use of beach umbrellas and lounge chairs, bicycles and a daily poolside ritual iced tea service that includes fruit skewers. Guests pay whether they use the services or not.

Other hotels are adding mandatory tips.

The Fairmont Southampton in Bermuda, which was recently charging $469 a night, charges a resort fee and mandatory gratuities for each person in a room. So two adults and two kids sharing a room would incur $48.28 a night in resort fees and $40.80 tips — adding 19% to the nightly rate.

And the fees aren’t limited to resorts anymore. The Serrano hotel in downtown San Francisco adds on a $20 per night “Urban Fee” that includes Internet, local phone calls, newspapers, morning coffee and use of bicycles.

Perhaps nowhere are hotels pushing fees further than in Las Vegas. Forget resort fees. Those are taken for granted there. Resorts like The Bellagio are learning from airlines and selling enhancements.

Want to skip the notoriously long Las Vegas check-in lines? That will be $30 extra. Want to check-in early? That’s another $30. Check-out late? Also $30.

And if you want two queen beds or one king bed, it will cost extra to guarantee your preference. For an extra — you guessed it — $30, the Bellagio will lock in three room preferences such as bed type, requests to be near or far away from the elevators, rooms on a high or low floor or the option to have quieter non-connecting rooms.

Then there was the fee Hank Phillippi Ryan, a mystery writer, faced while in town to sign copies of her new book “Truth Be Told” at a convention. Before heading to the airport, she went to the lobby of the Paris Las Vegas Hotel and Casino to print her boarding pass. There a kiosk offered the service — for $7.95.

“I think I actually yelped,” she recalls. “I had never seen that before.”

Additional reporting by Mashable

Read more: http://mashable.com/2014/08/25/hotels-fees/

Your next car is going to be something incredible.

1. Built-in 4G LTE Wi-Fi hotspots for always staying connected on the road.

Buick

Why It’s Cool: A growing number of manufacturers like Buick, GMC, and Chevrolet are including built-in 4G LTE hotspots in their cars, allowing drivers to use their phones, tablets, and laptops without having to use their expensive data or pull over to the nearest Starbucks. Just don’t try to use your tech while driving, please.

2. Cameras that see everything around your car, not just behind it.

Infiniti

Why It’s Cool: While more cars nowadays are coming with rear-view cameras, companies like Ford and Infiniti are including cameras that allow drivers to see everything else around their car when driving. In fact, these futuristic cameras also come with sensors to actually inform you when you’re about to hit something, saving you the confrontation and guilt.

3. Trunks that automatically open even if your hands are full.

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Why It’s Cool: It’s always a nightmare trying to open your trunk when your hands are full with groceries or beach stuff; you usually end up trying to kick your trunk open or do some awkward hand dance move to make it work. The 2015 Kia Sedona helps you out by automatically opening your trunk when it detects your smart key in your pocket, and is even programmable for safety and easy access.

Kia

4. Windows that clean themselves and deflect liquid automatically.

Kia

Why It’s Cool: Kia and other car makers are actively featuring “hydrophobic” windows for its 2015 and 2016 car models, which is coated glass that stops stuff like rain, dirt, and other debris from even touching your precious windows. It’s like built-in Rain-X for your ride, without the need to apply it yourself.

5. A built-in vacuum for spontaneous spills and cleaning spells.

Honda

Why It’s Cool: Car lovers are definitely familiar with Shop-Vac, which makes efficient vacuums for any vehicle out there. The 2014 and 2015 Honda Odyssey capitalizes on that love and actually includes a built-in vacuum with a long range hose for people who are interested in keeping everything clean all the time.

6. NASA-approved car seats that prevent fatigue on long drives.

Nissan

Why It’s Cool: Road trip-inflicted sore butts can make the best of us cranky. To counter this tragedy, the surprising duo of Nissan and NASA teamed up to develop “zero gravity” seats that keep you in a natural posture, while comforting your muscles and spines with cushioning. That’s true space-age technology.

7. Car seats that can actually give you a massage while being heated or cooled.

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Why It’s Cool: Being able to warm or cool car seats in cars like the 2015 Kia Sedona and 2015 Ford Edge is awesome. Mercedes-Benz’s line of S-Class cars takes it to the next level and has six massage modes built into the car seat, including “hot stone” and “workout” massage modes for feeling relaxed and invigorated after those long days.

Mercedes-Benz USA

8. Lighter cars, thanks to the use of military-grade aluminum.

Wikimedia Commons

Why It’s Cool: These days, the concept of a “light car” doesn’t just apply to those cute little smart vehicles you see roaming around the mall. Take a truck like the 2015 Ford F-150, which is 700 pounds lighter, or even Honda’s already light Fit hatchback which is 57 pounds lighter. This is thanks to the use of next-generation aluminum, which make cars more durable, more gas efficient, and easier to control.

9. Brakes and cameras that automatically keep you in the center of the lane.

Honda

Why It’s Cool: Everyone sometimes finds themself getting a bit too close to that yellow line. Thankfully, new versions of the Ford Fusion, Toyota Prius, and Lincoln MKZ have a feature called “lane centering,” which uses onboard cameras and the brakes to gently nudge your car into the center of a lane.

10. Cars that recognize traffic light changes and count down until the next green light.

Audi / Via Autoblog.com

Why It’s Cool: We spend at least 38 hours a year stuck in traffic, and that usually involves a lot of time looking at stoplights. Throughout the next few years, Audi is going to roll out a traffic light information system which will tell drivers how long until the next green light and also tell you fast or slow they should go to get to the next green light, all in one system.

11. Heated wiper blades that melt ice and snow to keep everything clear.

Thermalblade

Why It’s Cool: Winter drivers know the pain and agony of having to deal with the snow messing their vision up. It’s not a fun thing, but companies like Everblade and Thermalblade make affordable wiper blades that make quick work of ice and snow to make sure you never have to break out the squeegee yourself.

12. Way more gas-efficient engines and motors.

Patrick Emerson (Flickr, Creative Commons)

Why It’s Cool: While the price of gas might be going down recently, most of us agree that the less we have to fill up, the better life is. Cars like the 2015 Chrysler 200 sedan and the 2015 Honda Fit are starting to go beyond 30 miles per gallon, while even more beast-y vehicles like the 2015 Ford F-150 have more efficient cylinders to save drivers from heading to the pump too often.

13. Push button shifting for easy adjustments while on the road.

Honda / Via Carmatcher.com

Why It’s Cool: We’ve all been wowed by the push button ignition that has made its way to a number of cars in the past few years, but the 2015 Acura TLX and 2016 Honda Pilot add to the automatic ingenuity by having different buttons for different gears. This frees up more space in the center console, and even allows for different shifting modes for more efficient driving.

14. GPS that automatically analyzes traffic and finds the best way around it.

Pohanka Accura

Why It’s Cool: We can all agree that traffic sucks. Acura’s futuristic Real-Time Traffic feature on the 2016 MDX works with the built-in GPS system to find the best way to get around traffic, while spotting accidents, weather events, and construction on the road. It’s a lot less of a hassle (and safer) than pulling out your phone.

15. A sunfroof that automatically blocks light and lets you see what you want to.

Mercedes-Benz USA

Why It’s Cool: We’ve evolved past the point where sunroofs are only for looking cool and sticking your head out. Mercedes-Benz’s newer SLK models include a new “Magic Sky” sunroof that can be darkened to block out sunroof and UV rays, or lightened to see more of that big, beautiful clear sky.

16. Sensors that learn your driving style and can detect when you’re too tired to drive.

Mercedes-Benz USA

Why It’s Cool: After a long, tiring night, one of the worst decisions you can make is to drive and risk getting into a serious accident. To solve this, car companies like BMW and Mercedes-Benz have developed sensors and systems that learn how you drive and alert you to pull over and take a rest when you start swaying or being reckless.

17. An alternator that recycles energy for your car and saves gas.

Mazda

Why It’s Cool: Renewable energy is awesome, especially when it comes to cars. The 2014 Mazada6 has a technology called i-ELOOP, which stores kinetic energy every time it breaks, converts that energy to electricity, and uses that energy to power headlights, AC systems, and even car audio. That’s less fuel used for a happier you.

18. Access to your Android or iPhone without having to grab them while driving.

Apple

Why It’s Cool: Everyone (your dad, your local police officer, Demi Lovato) has told you to never, ever use your phone while driving. However, Google and Apple have recognized that people need to see information on their phones while driving, and created Android Auto and CarPlay for easy, safe access. Both are being built-in by a ton of car makers into a number of dashboards, but you can also buy a hybrid navigation system with both if you so desire.

19. Built-in night vision and radar detection for avoiding objects and wilderness.

BMW

Why It’s Cool: We’ve all experienced night drives when even your high beams aren’t enough to make you feel secure. But since we live in the future, car manufacturers like BMW and Audi have taken it upon themselves to develop actual night vision dashboard systems that work with sensors and allow you to see wildlife like deer or objects like trash cans in the complete dark.

20. Interfaces that recognize and automatically respond to your voice.

Fiat

Why It’s Cool: While we’re not quite there in terms of a fully talkative car like KITT from Knight Rider, the likes of Chrysler, Dodge, Fiat, Jeep, and more have implemented UConnect voice recognition systems in their 2015 models that respond to your voice for a number of tasks. Asking your car things like “Where is the nearest gas station?” or “How do I get home?” are finally possible and very convenient.

21. Car systems that alert you and automatically brake before a potential accident.

Wikimedia Commons

Why It’s Cool: Safety has always been the main focus for all car makers with each new technology that comes out. In the present day, some cars like the 2015 Honda Accord automatically vibrate your seat or steering wheel when you’re about to hit something from the front, while others like the 2015 Subaru Outback even take it further and automatically brake to stop a collision.

22. Speakers that provide actual surround sound.

Meridian Audio

Why It’s Cool: The one thing that drivers can always count on to keep them sane is their music and speakers, but it seems that there’s a never ending chase to have the best sounds and the deepest bass for the sickest drops. More cars are coming with standard speakers that bring the concert to your ride, with an example being the Land Rover’s Meridian sound system with a whopping 13 speakers, 12 channels, and multiple modes to get all your tunes right.

23. Automatic stop and start engines to save gas during those traffic jams.

Chevrolet

Why It’s Cool: Your car goes through a lot of fuel when it’s not moving in traffic, and some people even go through the measure of stopping their car when things come to a halt. The 2015 Chevy Malibu gets rid of all the guesswork and automatically stops a car if your foot is on the brake pedal during a jam, and restarts the car when your foot is off, saving your gas and saving the environment.

24. High beams that automatically adjust to not blind everyone else on the road.

BMW

Why It’s Cool: Your high beams are necessary when driving in the dark, but you’ve probably made a few people angry by having them on while they drive by in the other lane. BMW and Audi’s laser-powered high beam systems crank the brightness up high when there’s no one in front of you and dim themselves when there’s cars. Now there’s no possible way you can piss someone off with your headlights.

25. Automatic parallel and perpendicular parking systems.

Toyota

Why It’s Cool: If you live in a big city or an urban area in general, finding parking can get tough and usually leads you to the hassle of having to parallel park. Now, however, every company from Toyota to Lexus and Ford to Volvo includes parking assists which find a space and perform a near perfect parallel park maneuver without screwing up anyone’s bumper. This year, car maker Bosch is even gearing up to allow drivers to get out of a car and have vehicles park themselves with the help of an app.

26. Crash detection sensors that get you the help you need, fast.

Ford

Why It’s Cool: A car crash is among the scariest things anyone will go through, and if you’ve ever been in one, trying to signal for help becomes one of the hardest things to do. In the modern age, companies like Ford and GM use cellular connectivity and sensors to dial 911 and send help to where you are. Every second counts.

27. Cars that drive themselves.

Tesla

Why It’s Cool: The holy grail of futuristic car technology is having cars that drive themselves, and the newest version of Tesla’s Model S is right about there with its Autopilot feature. The system uses a camera, radar, and 360 degree sonar sensors to control speed, change lanes, turns, and park automatically. Self-driving cars are going to be among the hottest things in the automotive industry over the next few years, with GM and even Apple rumored to get in on the action.

Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/betonnorthshore/futuristic-car-features

1. Mardan Palace, Turkey

This stunning pool is located at the Mardan Palace hotel in Antalya, a city on the Mediterranean coast of southwestern Turkey.

2. Alila Villas, Bali

Richard Moross/Creative Commons / Via Flickr: richardmoross

The Alila Villas Uluwatu resort includes a gorgeous infinity pool and an overhanging cliff-side platform with dramatic views over the Indian Ocean.

3. San Alfonso del Mar, Chile

Stewart Cook / Rex USA

San Alfonso holds the current Guinness record as the world’s largest crystalline water pool, with an extension of more than one kilometer in length, eight hectares and 250 million liters of water.

4. Amirandes Grecotel Exclusive Resort, Greece

Styled after the sprawling palaces of the Minoan kings and Venetian nobles who once ruled Crete, Amirandes has the easy elegance of true European Luxury.

5. Springs Resort & Spa, Costa Rica

Las Lagunas offers twelve pools, eight of which are fed directly by water pumped from their Hot Mineral Springs.

6. The Cambrian Hotel, Switzerland

The Cambrian is among the Top 20 Swiss wellness hotels and includes a breathtaking view of the Swiss Alps.

7. Hotel Hacienda Na Xamena, Spain

This Ibizan finca style resort is suspended at 180 meters high at the top of a cliff with panoramic sea views, located in the heart of a preserved natural park.

8. The Grand Mauritian Resort & Spa, Mauritius

This tropical destination is located in Mauritius, an island nation in the Indian Ocean.

9. Ubud Hanging Gardens, Indonesia

Ubud’s infinity-edge swimming pool stands on two levels, perched over the spectacular rain forest.

10. Hotel Caruso, Italy

Found at the highest point of Ravello, this elliptically shaped pool borders a gorgeous view of the sea and mountains.

11. Golden Triangle Resort, Thailand

Robert Stokes/Creative Commons / Via Flickr: stokes

Located in Chiang Rai, this infinity pool offers a unique design and an incredible view.

12. Jade Mountain Resort, St. Lucia

At Jade Mountain, each suite includes an infinity pool overlooking the mountains of St. Lucia.

13. Crocosaurus Cove, Australia

As the only crocodile dive in Australia, Crocosaurus Cove invites thrill-seekers and adventurists to experience the Cage of Death.

14. Huvafen Fushi, Maldives

The Huvafen Fushi hotel is located in Maldives, an island nation in the Indian Ocean. The infinity pools have fiber optic lighting for a truly magical swimming experience.

15. Marina Bay Sands Resort, Singapore

VIVEK PRAKASH / Reuters

The Sands SkyPark infinity pool is 57 stories high and overlooks the Singapore skyline.

16. The Sarojin, Thailand

The luxurious swimming pool at The Sarojin has an infinity edge, jacuzzi lounge area and three drape-shaded pool island pavilions.

17. Elounda Gulf Villas and Suites, Greece

This award-winning luxury villa in Crete, Greece offers a variety of spa pools for a secluded vacationing experience.

18. Capella Pedregal Resort, Mexico

Capella Pedregal, the premier spa resort in Cabo San Lucas, sits on the southernmost tip of Mexico’s Baja California Peninsula.

19. Devil’s Pool, Victoria Falls

Charles Haynes/Creative Commons / Via Flickr: haynes

A naturally formed pool known as the Devil’s Pool is located at Victoria Falls in southern Africa. It peers at the edge of the 355 ft waterfall and is most often visited during the months of September to December.

20. Glenwood Hot Springs, Colorado

The water in Glenwood’s pools have fifteen minerals that help sooth and restore the body of their guests.

21. Golden Nugget, Las Vegas

The Tank at the Golden Nugget provides an exhilarating swimming experience with a secure water slide that tours underwater sea life.

22. The Joule Dallas, Texas

Diorama Sky/Creative Commons / Via Flickr: diorama_sky

Located in Dallas, Texas, The Joule has a rooftop pool that extends over the building, providing a fun view of the city.

23. NEMO33, Belgium

NEMO33 is the deepest indoor swimming pool in the world, with a maximum depth of 113 feet.

24. Blue Palace Resort & Spa, Greece

Blue Palace in Greece features 142 private pools, most of which are infinity style.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/ariellecalderon/amazing-pools-you-need-to-jump-in-before-you-die

Barley, hops, yeast, water, and a whole lot of aggravation.

1. “Is it ready yet?”

"Is it ready yet?"

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Making a homebrew takes time — usually about a month before it’s ready to drink. So no, the batch that I finished making 2 hours ago isn’t ready.

2. “You know Anheuser-Busch has already perfected this right?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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If you think that Anheuser-Busch is the pinnacle of beer making, then we probably weren’t going to be friends anyway.

3. “Oh, I love craft beer! Have you ever tried Blue Moon?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Oh man! You drink wheat beer?! How hipster! Do you know who brews Blue Moon? Take a guess.

4. “Have you ever made a PBR clone?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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The ingredients alone are more expensive than buying a case of the stuff. Plus, you want to wait a month to drink a PBR you made? Get out of my house.

5. “Is it ready yet?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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People are really impatient.

6. “Wouldn’t it just be easier to buy beer?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Yes, it is! However, homebrewers like to try something different. We’re usually the guys drinking smoked beer, or beer brewed with coffee or brains. We like pushing the envelope. We’re like the Steve Jobs of beer.

7. “Can you make me a watermelon/blueberry/honeysuckle beer?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Look, we love weird requests. And they sometimes work (put peanut butter in it!). But as much as we love trying ingredients we’ve never tried before, some shit just doesn’t work. If you want to see how the flavor profile of a pale ale changes with honeysuckle, maybe you should try brewing it yourself?

8. “Its ok, I’ll just drink it straight from the bottle.”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Oh, that’s fine. Let me know the next time you make a pie. I’ll just cram my face right into the pan, no worries. WOULDN’T WANT TO DIRTY A PLATE!

9. “Have you ever tried a beer with [insert completely random, terrible ingredient idea here]?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Chances are, if you wouldn’t try cooking with it, I won’t try brewing with it.

10. “Is it ready yet?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Really … don’t you have anything better to do?

11. “Hey Walter White? You cooking the blue stuff?”

"Hey Walter White? You cooking the blue stuff?"

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Via craftbeerlibrary.net

Yes, sometimes a serious brew rig looks like it might be able to produce enough blue stuff to keep Arizona tweaking for a decade. But you know how you can tell the difference? Meth doesn’t smell this good.

12. “Can I come over for your next brew day?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Of course you can. Just be ready to stand around and watch me wash/sanitize for hours. Yeah, there’s a lot of standing around.

13. “What do you like better: Coors, Miller, or Bud?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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If you think we’re drinking a Coors while we’re watching a Belgian Tripel mash out, you’re wrong.

14. “What brewery do you work for?”

"What brewery do you work for?"

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You haven’t heard of it, but you will!

*MANIACAL LAUGHTER*

15. “Is it ready yet?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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You really want to get punched in the face today, don’t you?

16. “Have you ever tried [insert nationally known brewery]?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Why no, I’ve never heard of a Samuel Adams Brewery! What do they make? Vice Presidential beer?

17. “Can you make a Bud Light Lime clone?”

"Can you make a Bud Light Lime clone?"

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You really don’t get this whole homebrew thing do you?

18. “Oh yeah, I bought one of those kits online too.”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Do you even know what a hot break is?

19. “Why don’t you make it like 20% ABV!!?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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At that point, wouldn’t you just want a nice glass of scotch?

20. “I like Miller Lite the best because it’s ‘triple hops brewed.’”

"I like Miller Lite the best because it’s 'triple hops brewed.'"

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Photo Credit: Daniel Piraino via Compfight cc

You obviously have no idea what you’re talking about.

21. “I love that signature beachwood aging flavor you get in Budweiser.”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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… I got nothing.

22. “I love Coors because it’s brewed cold and I know so because the mountains are blue!”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Uh … hey man, is your ear bleeding?

23. “Is it ready yet?”

23 Things Homebrewers Are Tired Of Hearing

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Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/justinlehmann/23-things-homebrewers-are-tired-of-hearing-ghjm